Words & Pictures

Words & Pictures

0 notes &

Free Kimchi (7/11 Nights)

image

These guys told me their names but they got lost between their drunkenness and mine. It was late and they pulled up seats next to mine at ‘Bar Seven’. We “talked” for over an hour, me without a word of Korean and them with only a handful of English at best. Somehow we communicated- they taught me the Korean word for ‘cheers!’ and we used it a lot. The guy in the right asked me if I liked kimchi - a sort of spicy, fermented Korean coleslaw- and I said that I did.

"My wife’s kimchi number one! She make you!" At which point he insisted, really insisted on taking my address so that he could send me some of his wife’s grade-A kimchi.

We shuffled conversation around a while longer, those guys draining shoju, me with my beer, and then a huge black car pulls up (the cars here come in only black, white or silver. They’re usually Kias).

"Aha!" proclaimed the  man on the right, excitedly, "My wife!". The woman in the drivers seat looking at me, smiling but somewhat off-guard, over the slight annoyance of having to collect her well-oiled husband from his fun.

"You will make him kimchi!" He said, pointing at me as he fell into the back seat of the car. The wife smiled nervously at me, shooting a scolding look back at him that bounced off his shield of inebriation. 

I still haven’t received any kimchi.

Filed under stories Photos Black and White seoul photography kimchi

0 notes &

'Eve' (7/11 Nights)

This is “Eebu”. Or rather, “Eve”- a combination of Asian pronunciation, exacerbated by a cold, turning Vs to Bs. It’s his nickname- he was born on Christmas Eve. He’s my local ersatz bartender, he;s the all night Seven-Eleven clerk. I drop by there every night, for water, or toilet paper, or smokes, something to eat, or tonight, to sit outside and drink some beers. Between customers Eebu comes out for a smoke and a chat. His English is broken, but conversant. The result of having an aunt, or a cousin, married to a foreigner.

"When I was young my parents wanted me to be a judge, or something at City Hall. But in school I joined the band, learned the trumpet. Before that I was a good student, study velly velly hard. I was in the Top 8 in the school.

But I velly, velly LOVE the trumpet.

When I tell my father I want to be a trumpet player, he hit me! My mother cry.

But I love trumpet.

My father, my mother, my sister, I haven’t seen them for a year. Maybe next year I will see them”.

I’m not sure when this rift occurred as he;s way beyond high-school now. early thirties maybe.

I ask for his photo, he’s initially embarrassed, zipping up his company tabbard and asking me not to get his sandalled feet and leopard print cotton pants in shot (the only trousers Ive ever seen him wear).

"In Korea, Musician is paid very bad. I play for symphony orchestra but not enough money, so I also teach trumpet and, at night, I work here"

"When do you sleep?" I ask.

"Maybe two or three hour every morning, between here and my other job. Teaching.

When I was younger I played a lot of football- I football CRAZY! Now I watch all games. I like premiership.

I was good football player but I broke my leg and then I got very ‘pat’”- the Korean /f/ /p/ difficulty (Which often results in me being called ‘Pin’)

-“But fat is good for trumpet!

At two or three o’clock in the morning there are no customers, so I practice trumpet. I LOVE playing trumpet”

I like Eebu a lot. He’s a nice guy on hard times, the way nice guys often get, hopefully I’ll be lucky enough to hear him play sometime…

Filed under seven eleven seoul photography photo stories trumpet black and white

0 notes &

The Film Makers (7/11 Nights)

One of my favourite things about Korea is the garden furniture often set up outside Seven Eleven, turning them into probably the cheapest bars in the city.

There’s one really close to my apartment, set one road back from some major traffic, it’s neighboured by a bibimbap restaurant and looks out over the back of some other kind of restaurant that I have no desire to ever eat in ,based on the things I’ve seen going on from that sweet spot by the Seven.

It was the end of my working week and I stopped off there, it being nicely positioned at the halfway point in the three minute walk from the station to my front door, to ease into the weekend with a beer. I pulled up one of the red plastic chairs, cracked a beer, lit a smoke and took up my notebook.

I was getting to the end of that first, freedom beer when I became aware of a shape, a figure, hovering nervously at the edge of my vision. Looking up I saw a tall, young kid- polo shirt, chinos and those thick-rimmed specks so popular, and so fitting, in Asia. Removing my earphones I returned his uncertain smile and said “Hi”. I noticed then his friends, stood further off to one side, four or five kids in their late teens or early twenties, at once trying to disassociate themselves from him and any potential embarrassment, while simultaneous hanging on the moment.

The “Envoy” explained that they needed my help with some English. His friend had made a movie and they wanted to add some sort of caption and could I help?

As soon as I agreed, one of the group, the director, was jettisoned from the others and shoved my way. He was a goofy looking kid, yet possessed of an artistic intensity and integrity. He had shoulder length hair and wore his baseball cap inverted. He produced a Macbook from nowhere with a magicians flourish and placed it in front of me. The movie he’d made featured a kid, another of the group, shot mostly from behind and above- a GoPro camera fixed to his backpack- wandering around Seoul high-fiving strangers. It was a simple and wonderful idea. I loved it.

Once they had me hooked the rest of them all dashed over, surrounding me.There’s a kid with his hair fringed in a wide slash over one eye, wearing a T-shirt with a picture of the periodic table beneath the slogan “SCIENTISTS DO IT PERIODICALLY”; another, the star of the movie, was a pale collection of effeminate limbs and joints. He has a fluffy bundle of hair that seems to be exploding from beneath the rim of his baseball cap (right way round but pushed slightly back on his head). He’s wearing black denim cut-offs and a baggy white t-shirt that I think (should) read “FRANKIE SAYS RELAX”, but doesn’t. His whole style seems cut and pasted from a decade that was years gone before he was born.

Between them they cobbled together their English to explain in fractured sentences and heartfelt ideas what they wanted to say. I pulle dout my pen and notebook and began to fill in the cracks, smooth out the language and hopefully give them something they could use.

My first draft gets translated back to the group, there’s some discussion in Korean and then ideas for change are passed back. I write a second, something about how we’re all just friends waiting not to be strangers- my second beer gone, the third begun- and there’s an awkward moment as the words get translated. The moment stretches as the group consider it for a moment, asking for further clarification from ‘The Envoy” and then everyone breaks out smiling, happy. Apparently, I’d nailed it.

With the same legerdemain as he’d produced the laptop, the director hands me a bottle of cola and a box of chocolates, his intensity dropped in favour of this goofy, clownish smile. I accept but also demand a photo:-

Job done they leave to prowl the streets, directionless but free in their youth, close in their friendship, the night holding all the possibilities in the world, including the one we had shared.

(You can see the video here- although, unless they translated it in to Korean it appears they decided not to use my text afterall.)

Filed under short films seven eleven stories seoul photo photography Black and White

0 notes &

Smoke Break. Seoul. S. Korea. July 2014

There’s a restaurant of sorts and a 7/11 right out back of it. The 7/11 is equipped with an array of plastic B&Q garden furniture so that you can sit and enjoy your beer in a grimy backstreet amidst the tobacco and abattoir fugue that emanates from behind the scenes. Kitchen porters dash back and forth. They run outside and unload delivery trucks, hose them down and fling vinyl sacks of body parts inside. Every now and then, one of them runs outside for a moment of respite. None of them smoke a cigarette through, just a few furtive puffs and with a flick into the street it’s gone and theyve donned gloves and back to work.

Smoke Break. Seoul. S. Korea. July 2014

There’s a restaurant of sorts and a 7/11 right out back of it. The 7/11 is equipped with an array of plastic B&Q garden furniture so that you can sit and enjoy your beer in a grimy backstreet amidst the tobacco and abattoir fugue that emanates from behind the scenes. Kitchen porters dash back and forth. They run outside and unload delivery trucks, hose them down and fling vinyl sacks of body parts inside. Every now and then, one of them runs outside for a moment of respite. None of them smoke a cigarette through, just a few furtive puffs and with a flick into the street it’s gone and theyve donned gloves and back to work.

Filed under Seoul Photo Black and White smoking